Sunday, 19 March 2017

Ancestry Genetic Communities Coming Soon

Ancestry recently published a paper in Nature Communications (freely available here to download):
“Clustering of 770 thousand genomes reveals post-colonial population structure of North America”
By utilising the now very large amount of data available, with 3 million plus people tested, has allowed Ancestry with large amounts of computer power to analyse results and have been able to map DNA in specific locations and follow that DNA. 
 
This can only get better and more detailed as more people in specific communities around the world test.
My father was born in England, my mother is a fourth generation Australian of English, Irish and Welsh origin so I would expect to have  a good chance with an English community.


 This is a chart I made of the birthplaces of my ancestors (J. Paul Hawthorne set social media alight with this awhile ago now) so as you can see Kent is very heavily represented.
 
   So looking at the ethnicity you can see there is a new information. 
   One Genetic Community and when you click on the "View your Genetic Ancestry"




This is very promising and can only be expected to get much better as more people from these areas test. Interestingly I actually end up with two genetic communities:
Southern English and  English in the South East and they do separate out some of my matches. Some do end up in both groups.
Ancestry has separated the major communities so far into Europe, North America and South and Central America then each of these has sub-groups: (I would expect this to also develop further in the future).
 We live in interesting times and with the advent of analysis of big data sets, enhanced bioinformatics and the use of major computing power we are going to see some amazing things in the future.  Potentially this will even be in the not so distant future.
Even with all the caveats of ancestral markers and the way they are inherited and also potentially incorrect trees (the big data aspect  hopefully will even that out) I can this could provide some very interesting clues for adoptees and for genealogists in general.
Genetic communities is a feature that will become available to all Ancestry DNA members within the next month or so (I had heard a date of 28 March but can't guarantee that all three million users will have access by then).
 
 

Wednesday, 11 January 2017

Three Million and Counting!

Ancestry in a recent media release announced they have now passed the THREE MILLIONTH  autosomal DNA test.

Last year (22 June 2016) Ancestry announced they had just passed the two million people tested mark. Eleven months prior to that it was one million.




They also announced that they had sold 1.4 million tests in the last three months of 2016 and to put this in perspective they sold 390 000 more tests in the last three months of 2016 than they had sold in 2015. There has been mass advertising in a number of countries along with some pretty decent discounts so not a surprise for the good sales. 

The expansion of Ancestry DNA test kit sales early last year into 29 new countries will have also had an impact on those new kits being sold and hopefully new cousins being found.

It is unknown how many of those tests are still to come back for testing but it would not be any surprise if the four million autosomal mark was passed well before June.

This can only be a positive thing for all of us looking for those new cousins. 

With three million tests for comparison Ancestry is a pool you should be fishing in to find your cousins.  Have you tested yet?


Thursday, 15 December 2016

The Dinner Service


My grandmother’s dinner service originally consisted of an eight place setting: large dinner plate (8 ½ inches), sandwich plate (5 ¾ inches), bowl (5 ¾ inches), tea cup and saucer (4 ¾ inches). It also had a milk jug, sugar bowl, two gravy/sauce pitchers, two oval platters (14 inches) and a soup tureen with lid (11 inches). They have an ivory background colour with a pink rose transfer pattern and gilt edging. (see Fig.1)

Figure 1 Cup and saucer in Luxor Vellum rose pattern
They were made by Swinnertons Staffordshire England as per underside markings (see Fig 2).  Swinnertons registered their design number 837606 and this design was registered in 1940. [i] British potteries had been registering their patterns since 1842 with the Board of Trade. They are kept in numerical order by date registered with the original registrations kept at The National Archives Kew England. [ii] (see Fig. 2)

Figure 2 Potter  mark underside of items
 Swinnertons were a company formed in 1906. They were based in Hanley, one of the six towns that are now Stoke-On-Trent, Staffordshire. They specialised in earthenware, rather than the much more expensive fine bone china, aiming their product at middle class households. Earthenware has more plasticity and is more easily able to be shaped but is more porous and needs to be glazed for use. The earthenware formulation is 25% kaolin, 25% ball clay, 35% quartz and 15% feldspar and are fired to 12500C. [iii] By the 1940s they had purchased five other factories, three of whom made teapots.[iv]

     Figure 3 Luxor Vellum)
I was unable to determine the price of the set from contemporary resources in England but an indication may be seen from a 1949 advertisement in the Broken Hill, New South Wales paper Barrier Miner which has a 40 piece Swinnertons Luxor Vellum set at £6/19/6. [v]  This 1949 advertisement from the Beaudesert Times showed you were also able to buy single replacement pieces. [vi] (see Fig 3)       

                        
My grandmother Lilian Maud Philpott married Leslie Smith 10 September 1938 in St Stephens Tonbridge Kent England.[vii] Family story was that due to financial issues the traditional dinner service was not able to be given by the parents at the time of marriage.  The Second World War meant full employment and Lilian’s parents found the money and the dinner service was instead given on the occasion of their son, David’s birth 16 February 1940. Lilian and Leslie were living at 45 Burnham Crescent, Crayford at the time of the birth and Leslie was working at the Vickers Armstrong factory as a carpenter and munition worker. [viii]

The dinner service suffered its first casualties in November 1940 when a high explosive bomb exploded one street over and knocked two cups from the dresser.[ix]  Lilian packed the dinner service away for safe keeping and although more than 50 further bombs were dropped around their home in Crayford no further damage was done to the service during the war.

Sadly Leslie Smith was injured on military exercises in 1944, becoming a quadriplegic and dying of his injuries at Edenhall Hospital, Inveresk, Scotland, 14 December 1944. [x]

Lilian, as a single mother, then worked as a cook/housekeeper for a number of years and the dinner service remained packed away.

In May 1949, the dinner service accompanied Lilian and David aboard the Asturias as they emigrated to Sydney Australia arriving first in Fremantle, before their final destination of Sydney. [xi] At this time in Australia there was an acute housing shortage and Lilian was unable to establish a home on arrival, getting work at the Peoples’ Palace in Sydney while David entered the Salvation Army Orphanage in Goulburn. Finally in 1952 Lilian was able to rent a home in Goulburn and they were reunited and the dinner service was unpacked with another cup as a casualty, broken sometime over those years.

The service traveled with Lilian in a number of further moves over the years, being used only for special occasions, until her death in 1976 when it joined David in his home. Then it went from Brisbane to Melbourne in 1978 and then back to Brisbane in 1983, quite well packed as there were no further casualties. My parents and the dinner service moved in with me in 1986 and the service has followed us on some further moves until 2001. Since 2001, it has had pride of place in the china cabinet in Pallara, as a well loved, and well traveled family item.


[i] Pottery pattern registration number http://www.thepotteries.org/mark/reg.htm#NUMBERS
[ii] National Archives Kew England http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/help-with-your-research/research-guides/registered-designs-1839-1991/#6-the-classification-tables
[iii] Wikipedia  Earthenware https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthenware
[v] Advertising (1949, August 4). Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved 20 August, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article48598459
[vi] Advertising (1949, November 25). The Beaudesert Times (Qld. : 1908 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved 20 August, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article216183183
[vii] Marriage Certificate England and Wales 1938 Sep Q Tonbridge 2a 3720 (10 September 1938) PHILPOTT Lilian Maud and SMITH Leslie
[viii] Birth Certificate England and Wales 1940 Mar Q 2a 2143 (16 February 1940) SMITH David
[ix] Personal communication from my grandmother Lilian Maud Smith
[x] Death Certificate Scotland 14 December 1944 SMITH Leslie
[xi] National Archives of Australia; Queen Victoria Terrace, Parkes ACT 2600.; Inward passenger manifests for ships and aircraft arriving at Fremantle, Perth Airport and Western Australian outports from 1897-1963; Series Number: K 269; Reel Number: 103

Wednesday, 30 November 2016

Queensland Newspapers on Trove as of 30 November 2016



Queensland Newspapers digitised on Trove as of 30 November 2016
 

Remember that fuller runs of these and going past 1954 and other Queensland papers will be at the Queensland State Library and at least some at other libraries including University libraries around the country.
  • Balonne Beacon (St. George, Qld. : 1909 - 1954)

  • The Beaudesert Times (Qld. : 1908 - 1954)

  • The Border Star (Coolangatta, Qld. : 1929 - 1942)

  • Bowen Independent (Qld. : 1911 - 1954)

  • The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933)

  • Brisbane Telegraph (Qld. : 1948 - 1954)

  • Bundaberg Mail (Qld. : 1917 - 1925)

  • Bundaberg Mail and Burnett Advertiser (Qld. : 1892 - 1917)

  • Cairns Morning Post (Qld. : 1907 - 1909)

  • Cairns Post (Qld. : 1884 - 1893)

  • Cairns Post (Qld. : 1909 - 1954)

  • The Capricornian (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1875 - 1929)

  • The Central Queensland Herald (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1930 - 1956)

  • The Charleville Courier (Qld. : 1896 - 1898)

  • The Charleville Times (Brisbane, Qld. : 1896 - 1954)

  • Chronicle and North Coast Advertiser (Qld. : 1903 - 1922)

  • Cloncurry Advocate (Qld. : 1931 - 1953)

  • The Coolangatta Chronicle (Qld. : 1926)

  • The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864)

  • The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Qld. : 1933 - 1954)

  • The Daily Mail (Brisbane, Qld. : 1903 - 1926)

  • Daily Mercury (Mackay, Qld. : 1906 - 1954)

  • The Daily Northern Argus (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1875 - 1896)

  • Daily Standard (Brisbane, Qld. : 1912 - 1936)

  • The Dalby Herald (Qld. : 1910 - 1954)

  • Dalby Herald and Western Queensland Advertiser (Qld. : 1866 - 1879)

  • Darling Downs Gazette (Qld. : 1881 - 1922)

  • The Darling Downs Gazette and General Advertiser (Toowoomba, Qld. : 1858 - 1880)

  • Dayboro Times and Moreton Mail (Qld. : 1937 - 1940; 1945 - 1954)

  • The Evening Advocate (Innisfail, Qld. : 1941 - 1954)

  • The Evening News (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1924 - 1941)

  • The Evening Telegraph (Charters Towers, Qld. : 1901 - 1921)

  • Geraldton Advocate and Johnstone River Guardian (Qld. : 1895 - 1896)

  • Gympie Times and Mary River Mining Gazette (Qld. : 1868 - 1919)

  • Humpybong Weekly and Advertiser (Redcliffe, Qld. : 1927 - 1932)

  • Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser (Qld. : 1861)

  • Johnstone River Advocate (Geraldton, Qld. : 1906 - 1908)

  • Johnstone River Advocate and Innisfail News (Qld. : 1928 - 1941)

  • The Leader (Brisbane, Qld. : 1918 - 1919)

  • Logan Witness (Beenleigh, Qld. : 1878 - 1893)

  • Logan and Albert Advocate (Qld. : 1893 - 1900)

  • Logan and Albert Bulletin (Southport, Qld. : 1896 - 1901; 1909; 1921; 1922; 1928)

  • The Longreach Leader (Qld. : 1923 - 1954)

  • Mackay Mercury (Qld. : 1887 - 1905)

  • Mackay Mercury and South Kennedy Advertiser (Qld. : 1867 - 1887)

  • Maryborough Chronicle (Qld. : 1947 - 1954)

  • Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay and Burnett Advertiser (Qld. : 1860 - 1947)

  • The Moreton Bay Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1846 - 1861)

  • Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954)

  • Morning Post (Cairns, Qld. : 1897 - 1907)

  • Nambour Chronicle and North Coast Advertiser (Qld. : 1922 - 1954)

  • Nashville Times, Gympie and Mary River Mining Gazette (Qld. : 1868)

  • National Leader (Brisbane, Qld. : 1916 - 1918)

  • The North Australian (Brisbane, Qld. : 1863 - 1865)

  • North Australian and Queensland General Advertiser (Ipswich, Qld. : 1862 - 1863)

  • The North Australian, Ipswich and General Advertiser (Ipswich, Qld. : 1856 - 1862)

  • The North Queensland Register (Townsville, Qld. : 1892 - 1905)

  • Northern Argus (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1865 - 1874)

  • The Northern Herald (Cairns, Qld. : 1913 - 1939)

  • The Northern Miner (Charters Towers, Qld. : 1874 - 1954)

  • The Northern Mining Register (Charters Towers, Qld. : 1891 - 1892)

  • The Northern Sportsman (Innisfail, Qld. : 1928)

  • Pittsworth Sentinel (Qld. : 1919 - 1954)

  • The Proserpine Guardian (Qld. : 1935 - 1954)

  • Queensland Country Life (Qld. : 1900 - 1954)

  • Queensland Figaro (Brisbane, Qld. : 1883 - 1885)

  • Queensland Figaro (Brisbane, Qld. : 1901 - 1936)

  • Queensland Figaro and Punch (Brisbane, Qld. : 1885 - 1889)

  • Queensland Times (Ipswich) (Qld. : 1909 - 1954)

  • Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser (Qld. : 1861 - 1908)

  • The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939)

  • Rockhampton Bulletin (Qld. : 1871 - 1878)

  • Rockhampton Bulletin and Central Queensland Advertiser (Qld. : 1861 - 1871)

  • South Coast Bulletin (Southport, Qld. : 1929 - 1954)

  • The South Coast Express (Surfers Paradise, Qld. : 1949 - 1951)

  • South Coast News (Southport, Qld. : 1952 - 1954)

  • Southern Queensland Bulletin (Southport, Qld. : 1888 - 1891)

  • Southport and Nerang Bulletin (Qld. : 1893)

  • The St. George Standard and Balonne Advertiser (Qld. : 1878 - 1879; 1902 - 1904)

  • Sunday Mail (Brisbane) (Qld. : 1926 - 1954)

  • The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947)

  • Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser (Qld. : 1875 - 1902)

  • The Toowoomba Chronicle and Queensland Advertiser (Qld. : 1861 - 1875)

  • Townsville Daily Bulletin (Qld. : 1907 - 1954)

  • Truth (Brisbane, Qld. : 1900 - 1954)

  • Warwick Argus (Qld. : 1879 - 1901)

  • Warwick Argus and Tenterfield Chronicle (Qld. : 1866 - 1879)

  • Warwick Daily News (Qld. : 1919 -1954)

  • Warwick Examiner and Times (Qld. : 1867 - 1919)

  • The Week (Brisbane, Qld. : 1876 - 1934)

  • The Western Champion (Barcaldine, Qld. : 1922 - 1937)

  • The Western Champion (Blackall/Barcaldine, Qld. : 1879 - 1891)

  • The Western Champion and General Advertiser for the Central-Western Districts (Barcaldine, Qld. : 1892 - 1922)

  • Western Star (Roma) (Toowoomba, Qld. : 1948 - 1954)

  • Western Star and Roma Advertiser (Toowoomba, Qld. : 1875 - 1948)

  • Worker (Brisbane, Qld. : 1890 - 1955)