Wednesday, 23 October 2013

Story of the Wardrobe

It is interesting today to see the new homes being built with the large walk-in robes, some of which are the size of a bedroom ready for the many rows of clothes and shoes! 

A very different comparison to times past!

My Grandmother Myrtle Doris Weeks married her childhood sweetheart William George Busby 11 September 1939.

World War Two interfered with the establishment of their married life and Grandma stayed living with her mother after her marriage while her husband went off to war.

She worked hard to get things together so they could start their married life together when the War allowed.

Grandma looked for furniture,  put an item on lay-by making small regular payments from the marriage allotment paid to her by the Army until the item was paid for and she could bring it home.

Over the time of the war she gradually built her "glory house" rather than just the glory chest you often hear of young girls assembling in previous times. The furniture was stored in her room at her Mother's home (made it somewhat crowded but worth it she said to be ready for her home when the time came!)

The lay-bys were done through the furniture store, Tritton. Another store that is sadly no longer with us.


Tritton Letterhead 1941

She completed the payments for this wardrobe in 1942. It is not a large wardrobe  three feet wide, 14 inches deep, a total six feet high with a drawer underneath and the hanging section 52 inches high with one central mirrored door.

After her death in 2001 on clearing her home there were three wardrobes in the home. Two in her room, one of which still had Grand-dad's clothes in it and one for her clothes. The third wardrobe a much smaller one had belonged to my Mother.

You have to wonder whether the large walk-in robes with all bells and whistles make the modern person as happy as Grandma  was when she was getting ready, setting up for her home after the war.


The wardrobe has now gone to a new home, being used to store clothes for a 18 month old child. I believe Grandma would be pleased.